Power BI vs. Pyramid

I’ve never thought I’d see this one coming but today I got a marketing email from Pyramid Analytics (previously an ardent Microsoft partner) citing a head-to-head comparison with Power BI. Et tu, Brute?

“Let’s start with a clear pricing model – one that doesn’t require an online calculator to figure out annual costs. Let’s add in fundamental capabilities and features like dashboarding, KPI’s, dicing, time intelligence, parameterization, and asymmetric reporting. Let’s close out with a complete lack of narrative reporting capabilities. The Pyramid Analytics platform provides an enterprise class on-premises BI solution that delivers all of the above plus simple advanced analytics. It’s available now and at a price you can easily understand. There’s a clear choice. Click here for a head-to-head comparison and a limited time offer”

I pity any vendor that competes with Power BI, especially the ones that compete “head-to-head”. Pyramid must feel the heat to come up with this “The Choice is Clear” marketing banner. But to me it’s not very clear and to keep ’em honest, their costing comparison is fabricated. According to Pyramid, you have to cough up $66,000/year for 100 users. But wait, the asterisks below tells us “*If data becomes too large for a single P1 node, additional nodes can be purchased for an additional $60,000/yr”. The choice is clear, right?

081617_1705_PowerBIvsPy1.png

Actually, it’s not and you don’t need the online calculator. It’s true that if you go with Power BI Premium, you’d pay $66,000 but why would you for 100 users (or 50 viewers to be more accurate)? If you choose instead the per-user pricing model ($10/user/mo), then your cost would be $12,000 per year not considering any additional discount you might get from Microsoft. So, that’s $3,000 lower than Pyramid. And, you’ll get a cloud solution that improves every month, plus a free Power BI Desktop tool. Or, if you want to save even more, you can go on-prem by deploying to Power BI Report Server which might be covered by an existing SQL Server Enterprise Edition license. Then, your software cost might be zero, plus one or more Power BI Pro $10/mo licenses for report authors.

Aside the Power BI Premium-only features, from a pure costing perspective switching to Power BI Premium makes sense above 500 users. It’s simple math.

About the second “Head-to-Head Comparison” page that shows that Pyramid outshines Power BI in every possible way, it doesn’t mean much without substance. I’m looking forward to the extended banner with more detail that explain how Pyramid exceeds the Power BI dashboarding, KPI, dicing, time intelligence, parameterization, and asymmetric reporting (whatever this means) capabilities. As far as “complete lack of narrative reporting capabilities”, this is not true either. Power BI has a Narative Science custom visual and Pyramid should know this.

Creating PBI Detail Reports

Related to the previous blog, let’s show how to create a detail report in Power BI that mimics an Excel PivotTable report in a flattened layout. Consider the report below. To create it, use the Matrix visual and add the necessary fields to the Rows bucket and measures to the Values bucket. By default and similar to Excel, Matrix would use a Stepped layout so that each time you expand a field, the next field would use the same column to minimize horizontal space. In the Format tab, in the “Row headers” section there is a setting “Stepped layout” that is easy to miss. When you switch it to Off, Matrix is now configured to mimic the Excel Tabular (flattened) report layout. Now right-click on the report each field that you want to expand, and then click “Expand to next level”.

081217_2015_CreatingPBI1.png

There are currently two limitations that I hope will be lifted soon. There isn’t an option to expand all fields in one step so you have to expand one field at the time. More importantly, currently there isn’t a way to disable specific totals. The “Total row” option in the Format tab toggles on/off all subtotals. Having report subtotals might lead to a performance issue (see my previous blog for more detail). UPDATE 8/14/2017 – The latter limitation has been lifted in the August release of Power BI Desktop, which now supports configuring row subtotals per level (turn the “Per row level” to on in the Subtotals section of the Format tab) .

Considerations for Detail Reports

Nobody likes watching a report spinny. Interactive detail reports that perform well from an Analysis Services semantic layer have been the bane of my BI career. A “detail report” is a report that requests data at a lower level, e.g. policy in the insurance business, customer in Sales, etc. A detail report typically has many dimension attributes, eustomer Name, Account Number, Product Name, Product Number, etc. And, the more columns you add, the slower the report gets. The reason why such reports don’t typically perform so well when generated from a semantic layer is that Analysis Services is not SQL Server.

Multidimensional is an attribute-based model and the server cross joins the member values when you add attributes to the report. Don’t be misled by the “relational” nature of Tabular either. Its database engine (xVelocity) is an in-memory columnar database that still cross joins the column values. That said, Tabular should give you a performance boost for two reasons. First, its in-memory nature is generally faster than Multidimensional. Second, Excel has been optimized for Tabular, as I explain in my “Optimizing Distinct Count Excel Reports” blog, thanks to the undocumented PreferredQueryPatterns settings (although not listed in the msmdsrv.ini, it defaults to 1).

In a recent project, I migrated a customer from Multidimensional to Tabular. Besides other benefits, such of elimination of snapshots, reducing dramatically ETL time and analyzing data as of any date (not just at the month end), the customer wanted to improve performance of Excel detail reports. Previously, some of the detail reports would never return. After the migration, these reports would execute within a minute, and in seconds if the Excel subtotals are disabled.

Here are some tips you might find useful if you’re tasked to produce detail reports:

  1. If the detail reports don’t require too much interactivity, consider implementing them as SSRS paginated reports that connect directly to the database. The chances are that this approach will give you the fastest performance as the Database Engine is designed to retrieve data in sets by rows and the number of columns won’t probably affect report performance (unless of course many joins are required).
  2. If it’s desired to connect these reports to a semantic layer, consider Tabular because it’s better for wide & flat results.
  3. If Excel is used as a front end, consider Excel 2016 as Microsoft has made various performance improvements for detail reports.
  4. Consider disabling Excel subtotals, as explained here. In my scenario, a detail report with no subtotals would execute under 15 seconds. However, if I enable just one column subtotal, Excel switches to a completely different query pattern (with many nested DrilldownMember levels) and the report query would take a minute. That’s because now the query needs to obtain the subtotals for each group from SSAS. Since we’re at the mercy of the Excel MDX query generator, I hope the Excel team finds a way to produce more optimal MDX queries. Ideally, a future Excel release would allow binding Excel native tables directly to SSAS with ability to define subtotals and optimized queries to load the data.
  5. In my experience, Power BI reports that generate DAX don’t perform necessarily any better. To make things worse, while the new PBI Matrix visual can be configured to a flattened layout, it doesn’t currently support disabling specific subtotals (currently, you can remove all row subtotals or have them for each and every column). And asking for subtotals for every column might not only contradict business requirements but it could also severely affect performance. UPDATE 8/14/2017 – The August release of Power BI Desktop supports configuring row subtotals per level.

Many thanks to Akshai Mirchandani for the SSAS product group for not losing patience throughout all these years from my complaints on this subject.

081217_1845_Considerati1.jpg